Drugs claim thousands of lives on an annual basis.

For instance, in 2017, over 70,000 people died from a drug overdose in the US.

Clearly, it pays to stay away from drugs and their potentially destructive impact.

But for many, that’s often easier said than done. After all, the nature of the disease means addiction is never easy to overcome. It’s all too easy to relapse back into drug use.

That’s why it’s crucial to have some effective tools in your ‘drug-relapse-prevention-kit’. In those moments where relapse feels inevitable, having an outlet is of utmost importance. It might even save your life.

CBD oil is one particular tool that may help. Interested in learning more?

Keep reading to discover all about CBD and how it can prevent drug relapse.

What is CBD Oil?

First, let’s take a look at what CBD actually is.

CBD is short for cannabidiol, which is one of many cannabinoids found in marijuana plants.

These naturally occurring chemical compounds have a variety of effects. For example, you’ve probably heard of THC. This particular cannabinoid contains the psychoactive elements that get you high. By contrast, CBD contains no psychoactive properties.

Instead, the magic power of CBD is the mass of health benefits it provides.

Indeed, CBD is becoming increasingly well-known. It’s now utilized in support of an array of health problems. Stress, anxiety, depression, epilepsy, acne, nausea, pain-relief – even the symptoms of cancer. They’re all aided by the use of CBD.

The compound gets harnessed in all manner of ways. Think gummy bears, tinctures, teas, coffees, and other edible treats. However, CBD oil is arguably the most common. It’s simply an oil (such as coconut or hemp-seed) that gets infused with CBD.

You can then use the oil however you deem fit.

How CBD Can Help Prevent Drug Relapse

Withdrawing from any addiction isn’t fun. It’s all too tempting to use in order to resolve the physical and mental turmoil that can occur. CBD can be used for your own improved well-being and reduced the chance of a relapse as a result.

Here’s how:

1. Reduced Anxiety

Most forms of addiction don’t exist in isolation.

It’s almost always comorbid with other intensely challenging negative experiences. Mental ill-health is one of them.

A vicious spiral can develop. Initial negative emotions can motivate substance use.

It might help in the short term to effectively eradicate the pain but it’s short-lived. Once the effects wear off, the emotional burden returns in force. People then use again, in higher doses, to get rid of it. And the cycle continues.

Anxiety may well have been a driving force behind initial drug use.

Unfortunately, it’s also a common experience when withdrawing from a wide array of drugs (including alcohol). Intense feelings of anxiety can amount to panic. Reverting to old habits and relapsing may be the only thing that makes sense.

Thankfully, CBD is a known salve for anxiety disorders. Taking it may relieve the anxiety enough to prevent a relapse.

2. Reduced Depression

Depression is another all too frequent withdrawal effect.

Deep despair and hopelessness can reign over the recovering addict. Darkness lurks around every corner. There’s no joy to be had. It can be lonely, crippling and bleak.

Over time, this can be hard to bear. Especially when you know that an easy fix is to simply use the drug again.

That temptation can be hard to resist.

CBD oil can be helpful here too. Indeed, it’s becoming increasingly popular as an alternative anti-depressant. It isn’t necessarily a total ‘cure’. But symptoms are generally eased. It does this by facilitating the release of serotonin (a known mood-enhancer) in our brains.

Even the slightest improvement in mood may be enough to prevent a relapse.  

3. Reduced Stress

Stress is renowned as a trigger for relapses. Think about tobacco smoking.

Cigarettes may have been someone’s go-to stress-reliever for years. If stress mounts, they smoke a cigarette and all is good. Once they quit smoking, this tool is no longer available. It’s all too easy to relapse.

The same goes for drug addiction.

Unfortunately, intense stress is another mental side-effect of drug withdrawal. The very experience of quitting a habit provokes stress. In essence, stress makes you want to use. And not being able to use makes you stressed. It’s another vicious circle.

Thankfully, CBD can stop it in its tracks. Ignoring the technical biological details, the overall effect is an increased ability to cope with stress levels.

4. Reduced Pain

Withdrawal symptoms have a physical impact too.

Flu-like symptoms, body aches, fevers, tremors, and deep discomfort all over are common. In extremes, it’s enough to make anyone want to relapse. After all, you know the drug will stop the problem (in the short term).

CBD oil is a known natural pain-killer. Thanks to its anti-inflammatory effects, it’s now being used in place of many traditional synthetic medications. Arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and chronic pain are all supported.

Feeling the pain of withdrawal? CBD oil may help. You can either rub it onto the specific area or ingest it for holistic benefits.

5. Improved Sleep

Insomnia and withdrawal go hand in hand.

It often feels impossible to sleep when you’re coming off drugs. Indeed, insomnia may precede the initial drug use. Substance abuse is often used to help people get some sleep. Without the drug, the same sleep deprivation may come back.

The inability to sleep exacerbates all other issues. Without it, everything suffers.

CBD can have a soothing, soporific effect that can tackle insomnia. Thanks to a reduction in stress, anxiety, depression, pain, irritability and so on, sleep is far more likely.

And you can’t think about relapsing when you’re unconscious!

Time to Wrap Up

There you have it: exactly how CBD oil can help prevent drug relapse.

Deaths from drug abuse are unfortunately common in the US. It’s in everyone’s health interests to steer clear of them. However, that’s often easier said than done. Relapsing is all too easy for recovering addicts.

Thankfully, CBD can help reduce the negative mental and physical symptoms that make relapsing more likely. If you’re at danger of relapsing, then consider giving it a go.

Read more: bing.com